Gladys Santiago

Faux Censorship

Posted in Advertising, Marketing, Television by Gladys Santiago on June 12, 2010

Shit My Dad Says

I’ve recently noticed an uptick of ads where swear words have been replaced or mildly censored.  This trend was prevalent before CBS introduced the sitcom $#*! My Dad Says as part of its fall lineup.  The show, which is based on a Twitter feed, has since garnered more press over its “edgy” title than its comedic quality.  To further push the envelop, CBS will air it on Thursdays at 8:30PM, a timeslot which is traditionally considered “family hour.”  Whether the show is a hit or gets canceled before mid-season, expect to see a lot more colorfully titled shows and films, with two recent examples being Dance Your Ass Off and Kick-Ass.

The promotional materials for Dance Your Ass Off substitute stars symbols for the letter S, but the name of the reality competition program has not been censored during broadcast network coverage of it.  Ads for Kick-Ass were displayed uncensored and hardly seemed risqué.  It seems attempts a censoring the language in titles and slogans works to highlight the swear words used.  The censoring of the titles $#*! My Dad Says and Dance Your Ass Off is meant to make otherwise bland/cookie-cutter shows seem innovative.

Using censorship to make boring content seem edgy is a fairly logical marketing approach.  What doesn’t make sense to be is why Dreamworks promoted Shrek Forever After with ads featuring the tag lines, “What the Shrek just happened?” and “Where my witches at?” To my knowledge there weren’t any protest against the ads even though they’re riddled with blatant innuendo that any child growing up with contemporary media would be able to decipher.  A children’s film isn’t the ideal arena to experiment with word-play derived from foul language, but it seems Dreamworks did.

Advertisements